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RWB secretary-general flies to Athens after state TV stations closed

first_img News Organisation The Greek police must show journalists can trust it with their protection after one was murdered and another is threatened to go further GreeceEurope – Central Asia Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire is flying to Athens today to meet with Greek journalists, including representatives of state broadcaster ERT, whose three TV stations were abruptly shut down by the government last night.Deloire will hold a news conference on the current state of freedom of information in Greece outside ERT headquarters at 11:00 AM tomorrow (08:00 GMT).He also plans to meet with Dimitris Trimis of the EYSEA journalists’ union, Theodora Oikonomudes of alternative citizen radio station Radiobubble, Kostas Vaxevanis, a journalist who is being tried for publishing part of the “Lagarde List” of suspected tax dodgers, and Lefteris Xaralambopoulos, a journalist who received death threats after investigating contraband oil shipments.A meeting with the information minister has also been requested.Reporters Without Borders issued a statement earlier today expressing its dismay at the government’s bizarre decision to shut down ERT’s three TV stations while the state broadcaster is overhauled.Greece has fallen almost 50 places in the past three years in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index, a record fall in such a short period for a European Union member state.The reasons include violence against reporters covering anti-austerity demonstrations, which goes completely unpunished, and threats against journalists and other news providers by the Golden Dawn party’s neo-Nazis. Against this backdrop, the closure of ERT’s TV stations has dealt a devastating blow to pluralism and freedom of information in Greece. Follow the news on Greece April 29, 2021 Find out more Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU News Newscenter_img Receive email alerts June 12, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 RWB secretary-general flies to Athens after state TV stations closed News RSF_en Help by sharing this information Greece’s new guidelines for policing protests threaten press freedom GreeceEurope – Central Asia June 2, 2021 Find out more February 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Two Caltech Professors Named Simons Investigators

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff Caltech professors Alexei Kitaev (left) and Christopher Umans (right). Credit: Lance Hayashida/Caltech and the EAS Communications Office/CaltechCaltech professors Alexei Kitaev and Christopher Umans have been named Simons Investigators. These appointments are given annually to “support outstanding scientists in their most productive years, when they are establishing creative new research directions.” Investigators receive $100,000 annually for five years.Alexei Kitaev, the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, studies quantum computation and related areas of theoretical physics. He was recognized for helping to found the field of topological quantum computing, which involves theoretical computing devices that use a type of elementary particle called an anyon to do computations.“The central idea is to protect quantum information from errors by encoding it in a collective state of many electrons called a ‘topological quantum phase,’” Kitaev says. “I proposed a scheme whereby a piece of quantum information is stored in a pair of particles called Majorana modes at the ends of a microscopic wire. This idea has been elaborated by other physicists and is now being tested experimentally.”In 2012, Kitaev received the $3 million Fundamental Physics Prize for his work developing algorithms and theories to enable quantum computing. A member of Caltech’s Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, he was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2008.Chris Umans, a professor of computer science, studies complexity theory, a field that aims to determine rigorously the possibilities and limitations of computation. “Computational complexity attempts to answer the question: ‘What is computationally feasible given limited computational resources?’” he says.Umans was noted by the Simons Foundation for his work on matrix multiplication, a prominent problem that involves the devising of optimal algorithms for multiplying two n-by-n matrices. The citation also noted his development of a “novel algorithm for polynomial factorization.”“The Simons award was a complete surprise! I am honored to be recognized in this way and grateful to the Simons Foundation for their support,” he says. “Long-term support like this allows researchers to really focus on difficult, long-term problems, and this is incredibly valuable, especially in these fields that are filled with deep, foundational open questions.”Umans also received an NSF CAREER award in 2004 and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in 2005.The Simons Foundation was founded in 1994 by Jim and Marilyn Simons to advance research in mathematics and the basic sciences. In 2012, the Simons Foundation awarded fellowships to Hirosi Ooguri, the Fred Kavli Professor of Theoretical Physics and Mathematics and Director of Caltech’s Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, and former professor of astrophysics Christopher Hirata (BS ’01), now a professor of physics at Ohio State University. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Tips To Rejuvenate Winter Dry, Chapped LipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Female Fashion Trends That Guys Can’t StandHerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribecenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week People Two Caltech Professors Named Simons Investigators By LORI DAJOSE Published on Friday, August 7, 2015 | 11:11 am Business News Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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High School field hockey season starts with playday Saturday in Castlegar

first_imgThe exhibition games are the first of the season for the field hockey stars.The L.V. Rogers Bombers play a trio of games Saturday starting at 9 a.m.The Bombers then take to the pitch at 12:15 p.m. before concluding the day with a game at 3 p.m.The B.C. High School AA Field Hockey Championships go November 2-4 in [email protected] While the volleyball players are bump and spike in Trail and Creston, respectively, the field hockey stars of the pitch begin the 2011 B.C. High School season with a playday at Pass Creek Park in Castlegar.last_img read more

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Race for McEachran hots up

first_imgQPR are planning to table a bid for Aston Villa’s England striker Darren Bent, according to the Daily Mirror.The paper also say Rangers may sell Adel Taarabt to Paris St Germain when the transfer window reopens and use the cash to reinvest in their squad.Taarabt’s QPR future is in serious doubt.Meanwhile, Villa appear to have entered the race to sign highly-rated youngster Josh McEachran on loan from Chelsea.The Daily Mail and The Guardian both suggest Villa are keen to land the midfielder, who has been linked with several other clubs – including Fulham.The Mail also report that Chelsea manager Andre Villas-Boas has had Tommy Langley removed as a pundit on the club’s television channel for criticising the Portuguese’s treatment of disenchanted players.The Guardian is one several papers to report Martin Jol’s denial of a bust-up with Fulham striker Bobby Zamora.On Tuesday, speaking ahead of tonight’s game against Manchester United, Whites boss Jol insisted there was no rift between himself and the player but said Zamora is no longer a first-choice forward.This page is updated throughout the day. Follow West London Sport on Twitterlast_img read more

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SA, US join to fight tuberculosis

first_imgNine-year-old Sammy and four-year-old Msizi are tuberculosis patients at Lifecare Knights hospital in Germiston. The Southern African region has the highest incidence of the disease in the world. (Image: World Lung Foundation)Janine ErasmusKwaZulu-Natal University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have joined to establish the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV, a research centre of international standard that will focus on contributing meaningfully to the global fight against tuberculosis (TB) and HIV.The two diseases often go hand in hand, as TB is increasingly seen as an opportunistic disease that takes advantage of HIV sufferers’ weakened immune system to entrench itself. While an opportunistic disease usually only appears when the immune system is compromised, TB is now seen as such a disease in those infected with the Aids virus.According to the World Health Organisation the disease is the leading infectious killer of people living with HIV and in fact, the two are so closely connected that the term “co-epidemic” or “dual epidemic” is often used to describe their relationship.In South Africa the dual epidemic is especially virulent, as the country has the highest number of HIV-positive people in the world. Many sufferers contract the extreme drug-resistant strain of TB, which was first noticed in Tugela Ferry in 2005. In the rural KwaZulu-Natal town, 44 people contracted the deadly TB strain – all were found to be HIV positive, and all but one of them died.International centre of research excellenceHowever, there is now fresh cause for hope. The KwaZulu-Natal research institute, which has been two years in the planning, was announced simultaneously in Washington, DC, and Durban on 19 March 2009.As part of its goal of becoming an international centre of research excellence, the institute will also concentrate its efforts on producing a new generation of research scientists that, with training in the field, will be able to competently tackle African issues.The facility will be housed in a brand-new six-floor state-of-the-art BSL-3 laboratory on the campus of the Nelson Mandela School of Medicine in Durban. A BSL-x classification refers to the biosafety level of a facility, and level three applies to those facilities, whether they are of a diagnostic, teaching, research, or production nature, that work with indigenous pathogens capable of causing serious or potentially lethal disease after inhalation.Construction of the building is expected to begin in September 2009.Supporting medical researchThe non-profit Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), established in the 1953 by the late aviation magnate Howard Hughes, is one of the largest private funding organisations for biological and medical research in the US.After the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the institute is the second-wealthiest philanthropic organisation in the US with an endowment of a staggering R180.7-billion (US$18.6-billion). It is also the second-best endowed medical research foundation in the world, coming in behind the UK’s Wellcome Trust.The HHMI will invest committed R583-million ($60-million) into the KwaZulu-Natal initiative over the next decade, providing R29-million ($3-million) in grant funding and for the construction of temporary laboratory facilities in 2009.Outgoing president of the HHMI, Thomas Cech, said that it was the joint view of the HHMI and the university that substantial investment into research in the heart of the pandemics of HIV and TB will yield major discoveries, and do much to alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases.“There is no better place on the continent to conduct research into TB,” said Professor Malegapuru Makgoba, vice-chancellor of KwaZulu-Natal University. “The partnership is addressing a real problem that affects real people.”According to Robert Tjian, the incoming president of the HHMI, the project will have global benefits. “This initiative is one of the most challenging we have embarked upon in our international programme,” he said. “I look forward to seeing how the facility realises the potential for developing new strategies to combat the dual scourge of HIV and tuberculosis – both for South Africa and the entire world.”The South African institute will focus initially on four core research areas – development of rapid and more effective tests for TB, research into the characteristics of drug resistant strains of TB, analysis of the complex immune response to TB, specifically among those already infected with HIV, and a study of recurrent TB in HIV-positive patients to assess the nature of the recurrence.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected] articlesIncentive scheme for the poorMobile HIV testing in KZN TB diagnosis breakthroughBig medicine from a little plant Alive & Kicking up a storm Useful linksHoward Hughes Medical InstituteKwaZulu-Natal UniversityHIV statistics – South AfricaWorld Health Organisation – TB and HIVWorld Health Organisation – South Africalast_img read more

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The oratory of Oliver Tambo: Ngoako Ramatlhodi on Oliver Tambo

first_imgRamatlhodi was the ANC president’s speechwriter. He recalls a sharp dresser who was meticulous in his attention to detail and unwaveringly dedicated to liberation.Ngoako Ramatlhodi remembers Oliver Tambo as meticulous, in dress and turn of phrase. (Image: Ngoako Ramatlhodi)Amukelani ChaukeThe late struggle stalwart Oliver Reginald Tambo was a perfectionist – he was so thorough and meticulous that in the late 1980s and early 1990s, he would make his speechwriters rewrite drafts until he was satisfied.In some instances, he would end up only reading the opening paragraphs of the speech and deliver the remainder of his address off-the-cuff.Before the era of computers, former public service and administration minister advocate Ngoako Ramatlhodi, who was a youth activist in his thirties at the time, was appointed speechwriter to the then exiled ANC president at a time when political parties were banned.Between 1987 and 1993 – during which time Tambo’s health took its toll following a stroke in the mid-1980s – Ramatlhodi, who had gained much political insight through his work in youth structures in exile, grew close to Tambo.The president was navigating sensitive political terrain while South Africa was on a knife’s edge and was on the verge of opening negotiations that would dismantle the apartheid regime.In an interview Ramatlhodi said that looking back on that period, writing for a selfless, great struggle stalwart such as Tambo was at times challenging and in some instances, very insightful.The advocate was part of a committee in the Presidency with veteran struggle stalwarts Jack Simons, Edwin Mabitse (real name Edward Mabitsela) and the first Speaker of the democratic parliament Frene Ginwala, who was based in London.“The two of us [Ramatlhodi and Mabitse] were made the president’s speech writers and secretaries and then we formed a committee in the Presidency with Jack Simons.“[We] would be faced with typewriters on a daily basis and the old man was a perfectionist – he would mark us red – there were no computers in those days. So if it is marked red, that means you are going to start afresh on the typewriter all over again.“But he would give us work quite ahead of time. Let’s say he was going to make a speech in May, he would then say a month before we should start drafting that speech, or a month and a half before. Then we kept on taking the drafts to him and he looks at them, asks you questions like ‘Do you understand what you are saying? Do you think the president of the ANC would say this like that?’“If you were properly dressed he would take off his glasses and say: ‘You look so smart.” (Image: Brand South Africa)“Then he puts you back in line and says I think you should articulate this thing this way and this way. And you would go and do a rewrite,” he said.In February, President Jacob Zuma declared 2017 the year of OR Tambo to recognise the struggle stalwart’s contribution to the liberation struggle. Ramatlhodi said Tambo was “a patriot” who cared about language.“He knew the politics, he had the content… He was very passionate about the liberation of our people and even in hard times, when he [fell ill] before 1985, he had a stroke and then we went to this conference in… Zambia and there he said ‘My body is weak; it is limping. But what remains of it shall be consumed in the struggle.’“He was definitely clear that he was going to fall with his boots on and I think that is what happened.”The rise of OR TamboBorn on 27 October 1917 in Kantilla, Bizana, in Mpondoland in the Eastern Cape, Tambo ran an attorney’s practice with Nelson Mandela in central Johannesburg in 1951 before Mandela was banned. This was after he joined the ANC in 1940.In 1953, Tambo’s profile as an anti-apartheid activist rose and he replaced the then national secretary, Walter Sisulu, who had been banned by the government for his role in the 1952 Defiance Campaign. In 1957, Tambo was elected deputy president of the ANC.Subsequent to the Sharpeville Massacre on 21 March 1960, Tambo embarked on a Mission in Exile to gain international support for the South African liberation movement. He became ANC president in 1969, a position he kept until 1991, making him the longest-serving president of the ANC.Ramatlhodi handed the penIn the late 1980s he recruited Ramatlhodi as his private secretary and speechwriter. At the time, Ramatlhodi was head of the ANC’s Regional Political and Military Council of the Zimbabwe Mission. He had spent time in Lesotho, where he was the student representative council (SRC) president at the National University of Lesotho. Former Reserve Bank governor Tito Mboweni was the secretary responsible for publicity in the same student body.Usually, Ramatlhodi would travel to Angola for military training and return to Lesotho to continue his studies. But on one occasion, he was told to go to Lusaka in Zambia because he “was needed” there.He was taken to the ANC’s headquarters in exile, where the liberation movement’s top officials were waiting for him, as was Mboweni.Ramatlhodi and Mboweni were briefed about what has taking place in Lesotho. Times were tense: the South African Defence Force had massacred ANC members in Lesotho, Botswana and Mozambique.Their appointment as envoys was mainly the result of the access they had to frontline leaders and ministers, including the prime minister of Lesotho at the time, through their SRC positions.Ramatlhodi was later deported from Lesotho and was sent to Russia. There, he did military combat work and on his return to Africa, he was put in charge of the council in the Zimbabwe Mission, when the ANC was devising a strategy to start negotiations with the apartheid regime.In 1987, he was appointed speechwriter to Tambo and formed part of the team that went on to draft the Harare Declaration.The Constitutional PrinciplesRamatlhodi said one of the most important documents he wrote under Tambo’s watch was the Constitutional Principles, which he co-drafted under the ANC Constitutional Committee to define a debate on the country’s new constitution.“We used to write [a lot of documents] but one of them had to do with the conditions for negotiations, which was a statement issued by the ANC on the conditions of negotiations, release of political prisoners, the unbanning of political organisations, all those things.“There are many, many documents that I wrote. For example, the Constitutional Principles of the region, which I participated in even when I was in Harare.”The Harare DeclarationIn 1989, Ramatlhodi was part of the team that drafted the liberation movement’s Harare Declaration, a historic paper that laid the basis for negotiations between the apartheid regime and the liberation movement.He said this was one of the most important pieces of writing that he was part of as Tambo’s speechwriter.“When we were drafting the Harare Declaration in 1989, we did a tour of the frontline seat – …Tanzania, Zimbabwe… for a week.“What happened was we wrote a draft… and sent it to people in South Africa and the neighbouring states for their comment and then we followed up to engage with the authorities so that they made their inputs into the final outcome of that document.”After the roadshow, they returned to Luanda in Angola to draft the final document before proceeding to Lusaka. In the group was former president Thabo Mbeki; ANC strategist and former head of policy and in the co-ordinating advisory unit in the Presidency Joel Netshitendzhe; intellectual and activist Pallo Jordan, former member of parliament and minister; and former justice minister Penuell Maduna.Ramatlhodi said Tambo was of the opinion that the document underemphasised the role of the armed struggle in the liberation war. He instructed Ramatlhodi to return to the team and raise the view as his own.“That’s Oliver Tambo for you. He did not want it to come from him because they would easily be persuaded because the president said so. So I had to go argue on that point on his behalf. So it illustrates the point that he was not self-imposing,” he said.The stroke and the comeback speechTambo suffered a mild stroke in 1981; eight years later, on 9 August 1989, he suffered a more severe stroke in Lusaka and was rushed to London. During his recovery, Ramatlhodi was sent to the British capital to help him regain his speech, as Tambo was only comfortable with people familiar to him.“Towards December that year the ANC was going to have a conference in South Africa, so I went back to help him regain his speech because he was comfortable with familiar surroundings.“We prepared the speech, which was a comeback speech, after 27 years, and he delivered it at the ANC conference at Nasrec, which was the first legal ANC conference in South Africa since 1960.“I showed him that speech on the machine manually. But the good thing about him – he was a fighter – by the time he returned [to South Africa], he was reading the speech. And he made many other speeches across the country subsequently,” said Ramatlhodi, who was 39 at the time.This followed then state president FW de Klerk unbanning all anti-apartheid political parties in February 1990, paving the way for negotiations that would end apartheid.Tambo delivered the speech on 16 December 1990 at a rally following the close of the ANC elective conference. It was at this gathering that Mandela was elected Tambo’s deputy president.In his speech, Tambo said: “South Africa is at the crossroads. Our struggle, complemented by efforts of the international community, has rendered apartheid unworkable. Thus, those who rule us without our consent have been compelled to accept the humanity of a black person in this country. For the first time in a period of 70 years, the legitimate aspirations of the overwhelming majority of our people have possibilities of being realised.”Tambo made several more speeches written by Ramatlhodi and at the ANC’s 48th National Conference in Durban in July 1991, he delivered what seemed to be a farewell speech in his opening address. He later told delegates of his intention to step down, urging them to support Mandela as his successor.After he declined a nomination to be president again, delegates created the national chairperson position in honour of Tambo.In the early hours of 24 April 1993, Tambo suffered his third and fatal stroke – two weeks after the assassination of Chris Hani, then leader of the SA Communist Party and Umkhonto we Sizwe chief of staff.Tambo the smart dresserRamatlhodi said while it was usually all hard work and putting pen to paper to craft speeches and document what would later become the liberation movement’s most-prized possessions, he remembered an ANC president who was a smart dresser.“He loved his clothes. And he wanted us to dress very well. If you were shabbily dressed he would look at you and [ask] ‘Ngoako, don’t you have clothes?’“I remember on one trip [during] the Harare Declaration, I don’t think I had enough suits with me. He called the late Stanley Mabizela and said ‘Take this man to town and buy him clothes.’ He gave him money. I got about three nice suits that day.“If you were properly dressed he would take off his glasses and say: ‘You look so smart.’”One of Ramatlhodi’s favourite phrases from the speeches he wrote was “United in our diversity”.“That line comes from a paragraph in our speech where we say: ‘We seek to create a united, democratic and non-racial society. We have a vision of a South Africa in which black and white shall live and work together as equals in conditions of peace and prosperity.’ Tambo made this speech at Georgetown University in Washington, DC on 27 January 1987. At this time, South Africa was at the height of the armed struggle.”Following his time as Tambo’s speechwriter, Ramatlhodi stayed on in the office of the Presidency when Mandela for about six months after Mandela took over. This was while Mandela, affectionately known as Madiba, embarked on a world tour as ANC president.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Which Color Grading Monitor Should I Buy?

first_imgLooking to build a color grading suite?  The following resources provide everything you need to know to pick the best grading monitor for professional results.If you’re new to color grading then the most important thing to know is that without a properly calibrated grading monitor it is impossible to promise your clients color accuracy.  Without a professional calibrated monitor you’re just whistling in the wind.So, given the vast array of options, budgets and opinions what is the best grading monitor to get?  Especially if you’re just starting out? Here is a round up of some of the best places to learn and some of the best people to learn from.How to Choose a Reference MonitorIf you’ve not heard of Alexis Van Hurkman then you won’t know that he literally wrote the manual for DaVinci Resolve, just released 12 hours of DaVinci Resolve video training and authored the excellent Color Correction Handbook. He’s also shares great color grading tips and insight on his blog and Twitter.Pull together $30,000 and buy a Dolby PRM-4200. It’s big (42?), it has nice deep blacks because of its insane backlighting technology, it’s got stable color, excellent shadow detail, multi-standard support, contains the full gamut of both Rec 709 and P3 for DCI work, and it’s a giant piece of equipment that will impress everyone who comes into your suite.Don’t have a spare $30k? Then definitely read the rest of Alexis’ post on how to choose a color grading monitor.  It is a detailed write-up on understanding the different sorts of grading monitors available.  The comments are certainly worth taking the time over too.Grading Monitor DiscussionThe third episode of the excellent Color Grading podcast from the Coloristos (three professional colorists) features a lengthy discussion of different monitors from Dolby, Sony, Panasonic, FSI and JVC. Its a little tricky to keep track of all the model numbers and such but this post on Lift Gamma Gain has them all typed up for you.  If you’re about to invest any serious money then this definitely worth a listen first.Affordable Grading MonitorsOkay, okay so what should you get if you want the absolute budget option, just to get you out of the gate? Well check out this previous post which features a great Macbreak Studio video (again featuring Alexis) where he answers more specifically which monitor to go for. There is also a great post from colorist Aaron Williams on his recommendations.How to set up a color grading suiteSo once you’ve gotten your expensive piece of equipment how do you set up your color grading suite correctly?  Well for a nuts and bolts view check out this six part video series from Steve Oakley and Carey Dissmore. Or check out this post for an easy to read technical walkthrough of a complete guide to setting up a color grading suite from Ryan E Walters –  covering everything from getting the right wall paint to using iPads in your color grading workflow.last_img read more

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Feds tariff relief plan faces criticism Morneau says 50 firms now surtaxfree

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government has so far exempted 50 Canadian companies from surtaxes imposed last summer when Ottawa slapped retaliatory tariffs on U.S. steel and aluminum imports, Finance Minister Bill Morneau said Tuesday as he faced pointed questions about his relief plan from political opponents.Morneau provided the figure before a parliamentary committee, where opposition MPs accused the government of being too slow in helping Canadian firms affected by the cross-border tariff fight.Members of the international trade committee also said Ottawa’s remission request process has been too onerous for many companies, particularly smaller ones already consumed by the day-to-day activities of running their businesses.“You said in your statement that we’re doing everything possible, but I have to be frank that we’ve heard quite the opposite here,” said New Democrat MP Tracey Ramsey.“From the witnesses at this committee, we’ve heard of the dire consequences of these tariffs and the government’s failure to get that support directly to people on the ground. Businesses are talking about laying off people.”Conservative MP Dean Allison said he’s heard from many businesses caught in the crossfire that are worried the financial relief isn’t arriving quickly enough.“I can assure you that that money cannot get out the door soon enough in order to keep these companies viable over the long term,” Allison told Morneau.The finance minister, who said 135 companies have submitted remission requests, agreed he would like to see the relief money flow faster — but he stressed there’s a process that must be followed.“This is pretty unprecedented. We aren’t in a situation where there’s a play book,” Morneau said. “And we certainly hope it goes away quickly.”In July, Ottawa applied retaliatory tariffs on $16.6-billion worth of U.S. imports of steel, aluminum and other products.The federal government has said it had no choice but to hit back at the U.S. with the countermeasures.It also announced a financial aid package for industries caught in the middle of the dispute, including up to $2 billion in new funding and support for workers in steel, aluminum and manufacturing sectors.During his appearance Tuesday, Morneau provided an update on another category of support provided via the aid package, which involves the Business Development Bank of Canada and Export Development Canada.So far, he said BDC has authorized loans totalling $131 million for 189 businesses, while EDC has authorized $44 million worth of loans for 24 clients.Morneau noted that firms approved for remission will also be eligible for refunds on duties they’ve already paid in the months since Ottawa imposed the counter-tariffs.He was asked how much extra revenue the surtaxes have already brought in, but he declined to provide a number and only said the duties were generating “significant” revenues.The tariff dispute has dragged on even though the Liberal government reached a new continental trade agreement this month with Washington and Mexico City. The Trump administration has maintained its stinging levies on Canadian steel and aluminum.Morneau said the government is still negotiating with U.S. officials in hopes of seeing the duties lifted.Committee member and fellow Liberal MP Peter Fonseca asked Morneau whether the government was considering a quota system as part of the potential solution to the tariff dispute.“We’re really not going to negotiate in public in terms of the actual approach that we’re trying to take,” said Morneau, adding he wants to make sure the market is stable and that the Canadian steel industry and users of steel are unharmed.“Clearly, we want to move away from the current situation. So, the mechanism to do that? We’re not at a stage where we’re able to talking about that because it’s not close to being done.”last_img read more

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Site C Projects Generate Opportunities Fund contributes 65000 to nine local nonprofit

first_imgSo far, $381,091 has been distributed to 43 projects.Applications for funding are accepted on an ongoing basis and funds are distributed quarterly over an eight-year period.For more information on the fund, including past recipients and application details, you can visit the Site C Project’s website.Here is a list of the recipients:Sources Community Resources Society for its ADHD Conference;North Peace Family SuperPark Society;North Peace Justice Society for its restorative justice volunteer facilitator training program;Peace Passage Skating Club for its 2019/2020 season;Fort St. John Women’s Resource Society for its community outreach;North Peace Gymnastics Association for its special abilities program;Fort St. John Literacy Society for its Dolly Parton Imagination Library program;Hudson’s Hope Fall Fair Society for its 27th Annual Hudson’s Hope Fall Fair; andCommunity Bridge for its Daddy and Me events. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Through the Site C Project’s Generate Opportunities Fund, B.C. Hydro is contributing $65,000 to support nine Peace Region non-profit groups.Award recipients for this funding provide community-enriching services in areas such as sports, literacy and social advocacy in support of youth, women, and families in the Peace Region.According to B.C. Hydro, since established in September 2016, this is the tenth time grants have been awarded from the $800,000 fund.last_img read more

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Steady beer supply kept ancient empire in Peru together Study

first_imgWashington DC: A steady supply of beer may have helped keep the Wari empire in Peru running for 500 years, eventually giving rise to the Incas, a study has found. At its height, the Wari empire covered an area the size of the Eastern seaboard of the US from New York City to Jacksonville. It lasted from 600 to 1100 AD, before eventually giving rise to the Inca. Archaeologists are studying remnants of the Wari culture to see what kept it ticking. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”This study helps us understand how beer fed the creation of complex political organisations,” said Ryan Williams, an associate curator at the Field Museum in the US. “We were able to apply new technologies to capture information about how ancient beer was produced and what it meant to societies in the past,” said Williams, lead author of the study published in the journal Sustainability. Nearly twenty years ago, the team discovered an ancient Wari brewery in Cerro Baul in the mountains of southern Peru. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”It was like a microbrewery in some respects. It was a production house, but the brewhouses and taverns would have been right next door,” said Williams. Since the beer they brewed, a light, sour beverage called chicha, was only good for about a week after being made, it was not shipped offsite — people had to come to festivals at Cerro Baul to drink it. These festivals were important to Wari society — between one and two hundred local political elites would attend, and they would drink chicha from three-foot-tall ceramic vessels decorated to look like Wari gods and leaders. “People would have come into this site, in these festive moments, in order to recreate and reaffirm their affiliation with these Wari lords and maybe bring tribute and pledge loyalty to the Wari state,” Williams said in a statement. In short, beer helped keep the empire together, researchers said. To learn more about the beer that played such an important role in Wari society, researchers analysed pieces of ceramic beer vessels from Cerro Baul. They used several techniques, including one that involved shooting a laser at a shard of a beer vessel to remove a tiny bit of material, and then heating that dust to the temperature of the surface of the Sun to break down the molecules that make it up. From there, the researchers were able to tell what atomic elements make up the sample, and how many — information that told researchers exactly where the clay came from and what the beer was made of. To check that the ingredients in chicha could indeed be transferred to the brewing vessels, the researchers worked with Peruvian brewers to recreate the brewing process.last_img read more

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